Lead Us Not Into Temptation

There was quite a hullabaloo in the press and an equal amount of murmurings from traditionalist camps in the second week of December over Pope Francis’ statement during his Wednesday audience in St. Peter’s square. The pope, without any equivocation, told us that a key part of the Lord’s Prayer, “lead us not into temptation,” has been mistranslated or misinterpreted for two millennia. If the pope’s novel correction to the Lord’s Prayer wasn’t beleaguered by a number of
many other doctrinally avant-garde teachings he has given us since he took office in 2013, such as the suggestion that hell does not exist or that we can’t judge homosexuals, we might not be as curious. But whether it’s pope or pauper who suggests that a 2000-year old prayer from the lips of none other than the Second Person of the Trinity has a major defect, we are obligated to take a very close look at the nature of the accusation. To be fair to Francis, asking God “not to lead us into temptation” is somewhat puzzling and at first sight seems to be totally out of character with God. Does God actually lead people into temptation so that we must plead with him not to do so on a daily basis? It prompted the pope to say, “No, that’s the devil’s business, not God’s.”

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02/05/20 Robert Sungenis Live! Ask Your Question: A new translation of the Our Father from Francis




1. Life is short
2. Shipping prices
3. Signing books
4. Books are made to order
5. Luminous mysteries
6. A new translation of the Our Father from Francis
7. Free Will and predestination
8. What do you think about E. Michael Jones and his writings, specifically the Jewish revolutionary spirit
9. Protestant scholarship relating to mutual submission
10. The role of women in the church
11. Liberal Catholic institutions
12. South American Catholics and worship of Mary
13. Writing too many books
14. Raymond Brown and Ephesians 5:21
15. Different kinds of slavery in the Bible
16. The meek will inherit the earth, what does that mean?
17. Synopsis of Luther
18. What happens to previously-stored up graces after the commission of mortal sin and restoration after good confession?

02/04/20 Robert Sungenis Live! Ask Your Question: What is the traditional patristic interpretation of Romans 11:29?

https://youtu.be/Dq7XyPFBxcw

1. Timing of the Passover between the Gospels
2. Darkening of the sun
3. Council of Constance and the papacy
4. Who is the judge at the particular judgment, the father, or the son?
5. Differences in Greek words for love in the Gospel of John
6. On working with Harold Camping
7. Does an SSPX Mass fulfil our Sunday obligation?
8. The Jezebel spirit
9. RFID chip and the mark of the beast
10. Interpretation of the Apocalypse
11. Can you expand on the Greek words for “know”?
12. The Gospel of Matthew 11:6, the Gospel being offensive to the sinner
13. What's your favorite book that you have written?
14. Special thanks to Jonathan Ross for all his work to stream these broadcasts across social media platforms
15. Were you Catholic when you got married?
16. What day did the Ascension of Our Lord happen?
17. What is the traditional patristic interpretation of Romans 11:29? Upcoming 30-page paper in Culture Wars magazine for March 2020
18. If Luther would have stayed in the church what reforms could he have made?
19. Why Luther was excommunicated?