Fr. Raymond Brown’s Hermeneutical Heresies

In Catholic biblical hermeneutics, a turning point occurred during the reign of Pius XII. In his encyclical Divino Afflante Spiritu, Pius believed it to be beneficial that Catholic biblical scholars be able to use the interpretive tools of what is known as “historical criticism.” In a word, it could be said that historical criticism seeks to apply scientific analysis to a written document. Is the document authentic? What is its date? Who wrote it? Did the author borrow from other sources? What type of literature is it? How much is the author influenced by his culture? Did the author fabricate, exaggerate, or embellish his story? These and many other questions the historical critic brings to his document. The document studied can be any piece of literature of historical worth – a sonnet by Shakespeare, a Greek tragedy by Homer, or even the United States Constitution. In a word, the historical critic tries to get to the real essence of the document so that he can find out the real truth of what occurred, or at least, what he thinks is the real
truth.

Read the Full Article (PDF)

Comments

Top 10 Posts (Last Year)

Discussion with Dr. R. Scott Clark of Westminster Theological Seminary and other Protestants on David’s Justification in Romans 4:5-8

Mark Shea's Muddled Liberal Thinking

“The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit and Its Impact on World History” A Review By Robert A. Sungenis, Ph.D.

Ruminations on Archbishop Viganó’s Recent Letter: Vatican II Is Not the Problem

Interview of Robert Sungenis by Protestant Dr. Michael Horton on the Topic of Justification

A Critique of Catholic Answers’ Tract on “Creation and Genesis”

Poor Catholics So Deceived about Evolution and the Bible A Critique of Brett Salkeld's Creationism as a Conspiracy Theory

The Death Penalty: Admissible or Inadmissible? A Response to Tim Staples and Catholic Answers

Lead Us Not Into Temptation

Review of : The Controversy of Zion by Douglas Reed